Site references

We’ve compiled various resources and evidence to support our data and help you understand the SurgiCount Safety-Sponge System and its benefits.

Site References

Citation references

Website References

1. Gawande, A. et al. “Risk Factors for Retained Instruments and Sponges after Surgery.” The New England Journal of Medicine. 348;3 (Jan 2003): 229 – 235.
2. Cima R. et al. “Using a Data-Matrix-Coded Sponge Counting System Across a Surgical Practice: Impact After 18 Months.” The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. 37:2. (Feb. 2011): 51-58.
3. The Joint Commission. “Strategies to prevent URFOs.” Quick Safety: An advisory on safety & quality issues. Issue 20. Jan. 2016.
4. Lagasse, Jeff. “Damages from left-behind surgical tools top billions as systems seek to end gruesome errors.” Healthcare Finance News. Web. May 2016.
5. Association of periOperative Nurses (AORN). “Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items.” AORN.org. Web. Sept. 2016.
6. American College of Surgeons (ACS). “Statement on the prevention of retained foreign bodies after surgery.” Bulletin of the American College of Surgeons. 90:10.Oct. 2005.
7. The Joint Commission. “Preventing unintended retained foreign objects.” Sentinel Event Alert. Issue 51. Oct. 2013.
8. GS1 Barcodes. http://40.gs1.org/. Web. Accessed Sept. 2016.
9. ECRI Institute. “Executive Brief: Top 10 patient safety concerns for healthcare organizations 2016.” April 2016.
10. Stryker internal data on file, Kalamazoo, Michigan. September 2016.
11. Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “Unique Device Identifier System: Frequently Asked Questions.” Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff. Vol. 1. Aug. 2014.
12. Sloane, Todd. “The high cost of inaction: How retained surgical sponges quietly drain hospital finances and not-so-quietly harm organizational reputations.” Becker’s Infection Control & Clinical Quality. (Aug. 2013.) Web. Sept. 2015.
13. Stryker internal data on file, Kalamazoo, Michigan. September 2016.
14. Makary, M et al. “Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US.” The BMJ (May 2016). Web. Sept. 2016.
15. “The Honor Roll of Best Hospitals 2015-2016.” U.S. News & World Report. (July, 2015). Web. Sept. 2016.
16. Competitive data reflects information accessed via marketing materials, IFUs and company websites as of April, 2016.
17. Eisler, P. “What Surgeons Leave Behind Costs Some Patients Dearly.” USA TODAY. March 8, 2013.
18. Association of perOperative Nurses (AORN). “2016 Guidelines for prevention of retained surgical items.” AORN.org. Web. May, 2016.
19. Greenberg, C. et al. “Bar-coding Surgical Sponges to Improve Safety: A Randomized Controlled Trial.” Annals of Surgery. 247: 4. (April 2008): 612-16.
20. Greenberg, C et al. “The Frequency and Significance of Discrepancies in the Surgical Count.” Annals of Surgery. 248:2. (Aug. 2008): 337-41
21. Martindell, D. “Update on the Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.” Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory, Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. 9:3. (Sept. 2012): 106-10.
22. Mehtsun, W. et al. “Surgical never events in the United States.” Surgery. 153:4. (2013): 465-472.
23. Gibbs, V. “No Thing Left Behind: Prevention of Retained Surgical Items Multi-Stakeholder Policy.” www.nothingleftbehind.org. (2013). Web. Sept. 2016.
24. The Leapfrog Group. “Patient Safety Improvements Remain Sluggish, but Some Hospitals Shine: Consistent Top Performers and Dramatic Stories of Improvement.” Hospital Patient Safety Score Report. www.hospitalsafetyscore.org. (Oct. 2015). Web. June 2016.
25. The Leapfrog Group. “Hospital Safety Score: Scoring Methodology.” Hospital Safety Score Report. www.hospitalsafetyscore.org. (April 2016). Web. April 2016.
26. Egorova, N. et al. “Managing the prevention of retained surgical instruments: what is the value of counting?” Annals of Surgery. 247. (2008): 13-18.
27. World Health Organization (WHO). “WHO Guidelines for Safe Surgery 2009: Safe Surgery Saves Lives.” Who.int. Web. June 2016.
28. Lagasse, J. “Damages left behind surgical tools top billions systems seek end gruesome errors.” Healthcare Finance News. www.healthcarefinancenews.com. (May 2016). Web. September 2016.
29. The Joint Commission. “Most Commonly Reviewed Sentinel Event Types.” jointcommission.org. Web. January 2017.

Did you know? References

1. Eisler, P. “What Surgeons Leave Behind Costs Some Patients Dearly.” USA TODAY. March 8, 2013.
2. The Joint Commission. “Strategies to prevent URFOs.” Quick Safety: An advisory on safety & quality issues. Issue 20. Jan. 2016.
3. Gawande, A. et al. “Risk Factors for Retained Instruments and Sponges after Surgery.” The New England Journal of Medicine. 348;3 (Jan 2003): 229 – 235.
4. Cima R. et al. “Using a Data-Matrix-Coded Sponge Counting System Across a Surgical Practice: Impact After 18 Months.” The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety. 37:2. (Feb. 2011): 51-58.
5. The Joint Commission. “Preventing unintended retained foreign objects.” Sentinel Event Alert. Issue 51. Oct. 2013.
6. Greenberg, C et al. “The Frequency and Significance of Discrepancies in the Surgical Count.” Annals of Surgery. 248:2. (Aug. 2008): 337-41
7. Martindell, D. “Update on the Prevention of Retained Surgical Items.” Pennsylvania Patient Safety Advisory, Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority. 9:3. (Sept. 2012): 106-10.
8. Sloane, Todd. “The high cost of inaction: How retained surgical sponges quietly drain hospital finances and not-so-quietly harm organizational reputations.” Becker’s Infection Control & Clinical Quality. (Aug. 2013.) Web. Sept. 2015.
9. Egorova, N. et al. “Managing the prevention of retained surgical instruments: what is the value of counting?” Annals of Surgery. 247. (2008): 13-18.
10. ECRI Institute. “Executive Brief: Top 10 patient safety concerns for healthcare organizations 2016.” April 2016.
11. Mehtsun, W. et al. “Surgical never events in the United States.” Surgery. 153:4. (2013): 465-472.
12. Association of periOperative Nurses (AORN). “Guideline for prevention of retained surgical items.” AORN.org. Web. Sept. 2016.
13. “The Honor Roll of Best Hospitals 2015-2016.” U.S. News & World Report. (July, 2015). Web. Sept. 2016.
14. The Joint Commission. “Most Commonly Reviewed Sentinel Event Types.” jointcommission.org. Web. January 2017.

  • “By using this sytem, we intend to elminate the chance of this happening to even one of our patients.”
    Patrick Branco, CEO, Ketchikan Medical Center 

     

Site References